Overview of Bipolar Disorder

Overview of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mental illness that causes dramatic changes in one’s mood, ability to think, and energy. The disorder causes one to experience extreme highs and lows, which are known as mania and depression. Mood swing episodes typically occur rarely, but can occur multiple times in a year. In between episodes, some individuals may not experience any symptoms.

The average age-of-onset of bipolar disorder is typically around 25, however, it can occur earlier. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, approximately 2.8% of the United States population is diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

The symptoms of bipolar disorder can worsen if left untreated. However, with treatment many individuals may find relief from symptoms and a better ability to live with the condition.

Types of Bipolar Disorder

There are three types of bipolar disorder, each with their own defining characteristics. 

  • Bipolar I Disorder: defined by severe manic episodes lasting at least seven days, as well as depressive episodes lasting at least two weeks
  • Bipolar II Disorder: defined by pattern of depressive and hypomanic episodes, but not manic episodes as severe as with Bipolar I
  • Cyclothymic Disorder: defined by periods of depressive and hypomanic symptoms lasting for at least two years, however, the symptoms do not meet the diagnostic requirements for a hypomanic episode and a depressive episode

SYMPTOMS

People having a manic episode may:

  • Talk faster or more than their usual
  • Feel jumpy or wired
  • Be distractible 
  • Have decreased need for sleep
  • Have heightened self-confidence
  • Think they can do many things at once
  • Engage in risky activities
  • Feel “up”
  • Feel irritable
  • Experience a loss of appetite

People having a depressive episode may:

  • Feel slowed down
  • Feel sad or hopeless
  • Have trouble sleeping or be sleeping too much\
  • Decreased ability to think or concentrate
  • Be forgetful
  • Talk slowly
  • Have little or no interest in activities that are normally enjoyable
  • Feel empty

Treatment

Treatment can often provide individuals relief from symptoms. Plans may vary but commonly include a combination of:

  • Psychotherapy
    • Psychotherapy (talk therapy) helps reduce symptoms of bipolar disorder for many. This type of therapy aims to help individuals identify and change negative emotions, thoughts, and behaviors.
  • Medication
    • Some medications may help decrease the symptoms of bipolar disorder. Many people work with their health care provider to try a few medications before deciding which is best for them. 
    • The medications used to treat bipolar disorder include mood stabilizers, second-generation antipsychotics, and antidepressants. In addition, medications used for sleep or to decrease anxiety may be prescribed.

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Major Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Pattern

Major Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Pattern

Major Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Pattern (formerly known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD) is a type of depression characterized by its recurrent seasonal pattern. With symptoms lasting about four to five months each year, the vast majority of people with this disorder experience their symptoms from late fall to winter. However, some may experience symptoms during the spring and summer, which is referred to as major depressive disorder with a summer pattern.

For those struggling with this disorder, there is hope. Like other types of depression, there are treatment options that have been proven beneficial to many.

SYMPTOMS

The signs and symptoms of major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern are associated with those of major depressive disorder. Common symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Feeling depressed most days
  • Loss of interest in once enjoyable activities
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Feeling a lack of energy
  • Changes in appetite or weight
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

Specific symptoms for major depressive disorder with a winter seasonal pattern

  • Social withdraw or distancing yourself from others
  • Oversleeping
  • Overeating, and particularly craving carbohydrates
  • Weight gain

Specific symptoms for major depressive disorder with a summer seasonal pattern

  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Restlessness
  • Poor appetite, leading to weight loss
  • Agitation

Risk Factors

Like many mental health conditions, there is no one cause or risk-factor for the disorder. However, the National Institute of Mental Health have studied various conditions that may increase one’s risk of having major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern. These studied factors that may increase prevalence of the disorder include:

  • Younger individuals are at higher risk
  • Women are more likely than men to experience this condition
  • Prevalence increases among people living in higher/northern latitudes

Treatment and Therapies

Treatment and therapies may vary but treatment plans commonly include:

  • Psychotherapy
    • Cognitive behavioral therapy is often used as it helps teach individuals how to replace negative thoughts with more positive ones.
  • Antidepressants
    • Like other forms, this type of depression is associated with disturbances in serotonin, which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can be used to treat.
  • Vitamin D
    • Many people with this disorder, especially those with a winter pattern, have a vitamin D deficiency. Due to this, nutritional supplements of vitamin D may help improve their symptoms.
  • Light therapy
    • Light therapy has been used since the 1980s to help treat the winter pattern type of this depressive disorder. Patients of this therapy sit in front of a very bright light (10,000 lux) each morning for about 30 to 45 minutes. 

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OCD Awareness Week

OCD Awareness Week

OCD Awareness week is recognized this year from October 9th to 15th. The week aims to spread awareness and education, provide hope, and put an end to stigmas about OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder). The International OCD Foundation has claimed the theme of this year’s awareness week to be “the road to reclaiming your life.” 

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a often long-term disorder in which an individual experiences uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions), and behaviors (compulsions) that they feel the urge to repeat over and over.

Based on data collected by Harvard Medical School and their National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), the lifetime prevalence of OCD among U.S. adults was 2.3%.

In order to provide help for those struggling with OCD, it is important to understand what the disorder is. The following provides information on the symptoms, causes, and treatment of OCD.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Obsessive-compulsive disorder causes obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors that interfere with daily life and typically last for at least an hour each day.

Obsessions are repeated thoughts, impulses, or mental images that can cause anxiety. Common obsessions include:

  • Doubts about having done something right, like turning off the stove
  • Desire to have things be symmetrical or in a specific order
  • Fear of germs or contamination
  • Thoughts about harming or having harmed someone
  • Disturbing thoughts or sexual images
  • Fear of losing control of one’s actions 

Compulsions are repetitive behaviors that a person with OCD feels driven to do in response to an obsessive thought. Common compulsions include:

  • Repeatedly checking things such as appliances, locks, or switches
  • Putting things in a particular and precise order
  • Constantly seeking approval or reassurance
  • Excessive cleaning and/or handwashing due to fear of germs
  • Compulsive counting

Causes and Risk Factors

Although the exact causes of OCD are unknown, health professionals have determined various risk factors for the disorder. These risk factors include, but are not limited to:

  • Genetics are often looked at as a risk factor for OCD. Many studies have shown that people with first-degree relatives (such as a parent, sibling, or child) who have OCD are at a higher risk for developing OCD themselves. 
  • Brain structure has been found to have links to OCD, although the connection is not yet entirely clear and research is still underway. Imaging studies have shown differences in the frontal cortex and subcortical structures of the brain in patients with OCD. 
  • Environment, such as childhood trauma, has been found as a risk factor for OCD by some studies. However, further research is needed to better understand the relationship between one’s environment and OCD.

Treatment

There are many forms of treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder, and some types may work better for different individuals. Many treatment options are often used together for the best results. Types of treatment include, but are not limited to:

  • Psychotherapy can be beneficial to both children and adults with OCD. There are various types of psychotherapy used to treat OCD including:
    • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help individuals better understand and learn to control their obsessions and compulsions
    • A type of CBT called exposure response and therapy helps teach individuals how to respond to the anxiety associated with obsessions and not respond with the compulsion
  • Medication may be used in the treatment of OCD. Various different medications may be prescribed, including:
    • SSRIs, a type of antidepressant, can be helpful for many in controlling obsessions and compulsions

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Types of Depression

Types of Depression

There are many different types of depression, each with their own causes and symptoms. It is important to speak with your healthcare provider if you believe you are experiencing symptoms of depression. By discovering what type of depression you are experiencing, the right treatment for you can be determined.

One of the most common mental health conditions is depression. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is estimated that 280 million people worldwide have depression.

Although the symptoms of depression may vary depending on what type you are experiencing, depression can often affect the way that an individual thinks, feels, and acts. Fortunately, treatment for depression has proven effective for many. With the right treatment plan many experience relief from their symptoms. 

The following consists of information on many, but not all, of the common types of depression. 

Types of Depression

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

  • For one to be diagnosed with MDD, their symptoms will have lasted for more than two weeks and typically cause significant interference with daily activities.

Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD) (also referred to as dysthymia)

  • PDD often causes less severe symptoms of depression. However, the symptoms last longer, typically for at least two years.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

  • For those with seasonal affective disorder, their symptoms typically come and go with the changing of seasons. Most individuals with SAD experience symptoms of depression in the fall and winter, with symptoms subsiding during the spring and summer months. 

Perinatal Depression

  • Perinatal depression can be experienced during pregnancy, or after delivery of the baby (postpartum depression).

SYmptoms

The signs and symptoms of depression vary by person and type of depression, but they commonly include:

  • Feeling sad or hopeless
  • Changes in sleeping pattern
  • Lack of interest in once enjoyable activities
  • Trouble thinking or concentrating
  • Changes in appetite
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability or frustration
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Lack of energy
  • Suicidal thoughts

Causes and RIsk Factors

There are many causes and risk factors for depression. Although there is no one clear cause for the disorder, risk factors include:

  • Life circumstances such as relationships, financial situations, and more can influence someone developing depression.
  • Trauma can cause long-term changes in the way that one thinks and make them more vulnerable to depression.
  • Genetics play a strong role in mood disorders as they tend to run in families.
  • Other medical conditions can contribute to depression. Many physical and mental health conditions can increase one’s risk for depression.

Treatment

Symptoms of depression can often be relieved through treatment. Studies show that depression is one of the most treatable mental illnesses. After proper evaluation, a health care provider can help create a treatment plan suited to you. Treatment plans may include a combination of:

  • Medication
    • Antidepressants are the most common medication used to treat depression. In some cases, mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications may also be prescribed.
  • Psychotherapy
    • Psychotherapy is commonly used to treat depression and can be very beneficial. Commonly used types of psychotherapy used in the treatment of depression include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, and family-focused therapy.
  • Self Help
    • There are a variety of ways that an individual can help reduce symptoms of depression. Symptoms of depression are often decreased by exercise, getting enough sleep, eating healthy, and more. 

Crisis Help

If you or a loved one is in a crisis, it is important to get help immediately. If in danger of suicide:

  • Call 911
  • Go to the nearest emergency room
  • Call the toll-free, 24-hour Suicide and Crisis Lifeline hotline at 988

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Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental Illness Awareness Week

During the first week of October each year, Mental Illness Awareness Week is recognized. The week aims to help spread education on various mental illnesses, as well as provide support to those who are struggling. In 1990, Congress officially established the first week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW).

Millions of Americans struggle with mental illness each year. Due to the prevalence of mental illness, it is important to spread awareness and hope to those who are affected. Although help for mental illnesses is important to discuss year-round, MIAW offers an additional chance for advocates to come together to provide support.

Mental Health by the Numbers

For those struggling with a mental illness, you are not alone. It is important to understand the prevalence of mental health conditions, and the suicidal thoughts that might follow.

The following statistics on mental illness have been found by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

  • 1 in 5 adults in the United States experience mental illness each year
  • 1 in 6 of U.S. youth aged 6-17 experience mental illness each year
  • 46.2% of U.S. adults with mental illness received treatment in 2020   
  • 11% of U.S. adults with mental illness had no insurance coverage in 2020
  • 150 million people live in a designated Mental Health Professional Shortage Area
  • Suicide is the 12th leading cause of death overall in the U.S (when looking at all ages)
  • 12+ million U.S adults had serious thoughts of suicide (2020)

Common Warning Signs

Warning signs vary by the type of mental illness, as well as the individual. Common signs of mental illnesses include, but are not limited to:

  • Feeling sad or low
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Irritability or strong feelings of anger
  • Excessive worry or fear
  • Extreme mood changes
  • Distancing self from friends or family
  • Changes in eating habits
  • Inability to carry out daily activities or tasks
  • Changes in sleeping habits
  • Difficulty perceiving reality

Risk Factors

People of all ages, gender, and background can be at risk for mental illnesses. There is no single cause of mental illnesses. Although the risk factors vary, they commonly include: 

  • Family history of mental illness
  • Traumatic experiences
  • Stressful life situations
  • Brain injuries
  • Previous mental illnesses
  • Chronic medical conditions

Treatment for Mental Illnesses

There are many forms of treatment for mental illnesses. The type of treatment varies on the type of mental illness and other factors. Many treatment options are often used together for the best results. Types of treatment for mental illnesses include, but are not limited to:

  • Psychotherapy, which may also be referred to as “talk therapy.” Psychotherapy offers individuals the chance to speak with a professionally trained therapist in a safe environment, in which they can explore and better understand their feelings, behaviors, and coping skills.
  • Medication may be used in the treatment of various mental illnesses. There are many different types of medications that may be prescribed. To help choose the right medication for you, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider about both the benefits and risks that a medication may cause.
  • Self-care techniques can be very beneficial to help decrease the symptoms of some mental illnesses. Although practicing self-care will likely not completely rid one of their symptoms, it can often help.

Crisis Lifeline

If you or a loved one is in a crisis, it is important to get help immediately. If in danger of suicide:

  • Call 911
  • Go to the nearest emergency room
  • Call the toll-free, 24-hour hotline of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 988

National Suicide Prevention Week

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Self-Care Tips for Autumn

As we welcome the new season, we would like to offer self-care tips for autumn. As the days get shorter, weather gets colder, and many peoples’ schedules get busier, it is essential to make time for self-care. Practicing self-care is key to maintaining a healthy mind and body, and bettering your overall wellness.

There are an infinite number of ways to practice self-care. With an individual’s differing needs and wants, it is important to recognize that people may enjoy varying ways of self-care. To discover what forms work best for you, we recommend trying various self-care strategies to help you see what you enjoy most.

The following list consists of various self-care tips for autumn that you can implement into your life to improve the health of your mind and body.

Get Enough Sleep

Sleep is essential to the health of one’s mind and body. Without enough sleep, it can be hard to think and feel motivated throughout the day. The CDC recommends that adults aged 18-60 get at least 7 hours of sleep each night. To help reach this goal, we suggest creating a sleep schedule, avoiding energizing activities in the evening, and making your sleeping environment comfortable.

Get Physical

Physical activity can improve the health of your body as well as your mind. Nice weather encourages many to get outdoors and be active, but sadly as fall comes in and the weather gets colder, you may find yourself becoming more sedentary. However, there are still many ways to be active indoors or outdoors with proper protection from the cold and rain. Discover forms of physical activity that make you feel happy and refreshed. It is important to note that no form of exercise is too small. Each step helps you work towards a healthier self.

Focus on Gratitude

It is hard to find happiness when focusing on the negatives in life. Try to look for the best in situations, and to focus on what you are grateful for. On days that are especially challenging mentally, try to find or create one positive from the day.

Eat Nutrient-Dense foods

Eating nutrient-dense foods helps promote better physical health, but it can also improve the health of your mind. Fall is the perfect time to make home-cooked meals such as casseroles or soups, which can both be made to contain a variety of healthy ingredients. The National Institute of Mental Health recommends eating a healthy, balanced diet and staying hydrated to help you think clearly and feel energized. 

Recognize Stressors

To help avoid stress, it is important to recognize what triggers it. Although many stressors may be unavoidable, others may be easier to avoid. Try to eliminate any unnecessary stressors from your life. 

Meditate

Meditation can help clear one’s mind and create a sense of balance. There are various methods of meditation, many of which may take some practice before their true benefit can be realized. Like all self-care, it is important to note that everyone has their own preference on what type of meditation they find most beneficial. 

DeClutter Your Space

You will likely be spending more time indoors in fall. Improve the comfort of your space by taking the time to declutter and reorganize your space. Many people find that their mindset and environment go hand-in-hand, so improving your surroundings may benefit your mental health.

Discover a New Hobby

For those who are finding themselves having extra free time, discovering a new hobby may be beneficial. Hobbies offer the chance to escape from daily stressors and can help redirect your brain to the things that make you happy. 

 Make time for Relaxation

It is important to make time in your day to relax. There are many ways to help you relax, including reading, taking a bath, listening to music, and more. However you like to relax, it is important to make time for it to help you recharge and let your mind find peace.

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Suicide Prevention Resources

Suicide Prevention Resources

Each September, Suicide Prevention Awareness Month is recognized. The month aims to bring awareness to suicide and the warning signs, as well as spread hope to those who are struggling.

Millions of Americans are affected by mental illness each year. It is important to understand the prevalence of mental health conditions, and the suicidal thoughts that might follow. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), over 12 million U.S adults had serious thoughts of suicide in 2020 alone. 

By raising awareness, showing support, and providing resources, we can help prevent suicide.

We recommend the following resources to help you learn about suicide prevention, as well as get support if you are struggling.

If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline at 988 or call 911 immediately.

Suicide Prevention Resources

Suicide & Crisis Lifeline: https://988lifeline.org/

For those wishing to speak on the phone, call 988.

 

  • If you’re thinking about suicide, are worried about a friend or loved one, or would like emotional support, the Lifeline network is available 24/7 across the United States.

 

The Trevor Project: https://www.thetrevorproject.org/

  • The Trevor Project offers a 24/7 call and text line for those who are struggling and need to speak with a counselor right away. In addition, they also offer many informational articles and resources related to LGBTQIA+ mental health.

 

Veterans Crisis Line: https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

For those wishing to speak on the phone, call 988 and press 1.

  • If you’re a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one, call to reach caring, qualified VA responders 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI): https://nami.org/Get-Involved/Awareness-Events/Suicide-Prevention-Awareness-Month-(SPAM)

  • NAMI offers information and resources on a variety of mental health topics, including suicide. 

 

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention

  • NIMH provides individuals with information on mental illnesses as well as suicide prevention.

 

Further Help & Learn More

For those seeking more suicide prevention resources, we recommend contacting your healthcare provider.

If you or a loved one is feeling suicidal, please get help right away. Call 911 or the Suicide Prevention Lifeline (available 24/7) at 988.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Social Anxiety Disorder

Social anxiety disorder is more than just shyness, but rather a serious mental health condition. Those with the disorder experience intense fear about social interaction, often due to irrational worries. These fears can interfere with one’s work, relationships, and other daily activities. However, treatment is available for social anxiety disorder and has proven beneficial for many.

What is Social Anxiety Disorder?

Social anxiety disorder is a common anxiety disorder that causes symptoms of anxiety and/or fear in social situations. The person may fear humiliation, judgment, or rejection. 

Everyday tasks such as ordering food, asking a question in class, using a public restroom, or more, can all be a challenge for those with the disorder. The fear is often so strong that individuals feel as though it is beyond their control. This can lead to troubles functioning throughout day-to-day life. 

Symptoms

Although symptoms vary, those with social anxiety disorder may experience the following symptoms when in front of or around others:

  • Not speaking or only speaking quietly
  • Making little eye contact
  • Feeling nauseous
  • Blushing, sweating, and/or trembling
  • Having a hard time talking to people
  • Feeling very self-conscious
  • Isolating from others

Treatment

Treatment plans vary, so it is important to speak with your health care provider to create a plan tailored to your specific needs. Your provider may refer you to a specialist, such as a psychiatrist, counselor, or psychologist. 

Social anxiety disorder is generally treated with psychotherapy (talk therapy), medication, or a combination of both. 

  • There are various types of psychotherapy, but cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is commonly used in treatment of this disorder. CBT helps teach individuals different ways to think and react in situations that cause anxiety.
  • Medication types that are commonly used to treat social anxiety disorder include anti-anxiety medications, antidepressants, and beta-blockers.

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Finding the Right Provider

Finding the Right Provider

Finding the right provider for you may seem like a daunting task. However, there are steps you can take to help ease the process and ensure you will find a provider that will be the right fit for you. 

When searching for a new provider, a good first step is to check what healthcare providers are covered by your insurance, if that is how you are hoping to pay. Many insurance plans offer a provider directory which gives you the contact information for various health offices and providers.

After determining what providers are “in network” for your insurance plan, then you can further choose a specific provider that you see best fit for you. There are many things to consider when choosing a new provider. By determining what you need and are hoping for in a provider, it will be easier to find the right match. We recommend asking yourself the following questions to help better determine what you are looking for:

  • Where am I hoping for the provider’s office to be located?
  • What kind of care am I seeking?
  • Do I have any specific problems I am hoping to address?
  • What are my goals for seeking therapy or other healthcare services?

In addition, some individuals might have specific preferences on the credentials and previous work history of their provider. 

Regardless of your answers to these questions, there is a provider out there who is right for you. Finding the perfect therapist or healthcare provider may seem challenging, but by doing so you are taking an important step towards bettering your overall wellness.

 

For those seeking care, we recommend visiting our team page and learning more about our specific providers. Our team comes from a diverse background of care and specialties. We take great pride in our team and their ability to best serve you. 

Visit our team page by clicking the following link: https://nwmind-bodywellness.com/meet-our-team/

To read more about the services we offer at NW Mind-Body Wellness, visit our about page at the following link: https://nwmind-bodywellness.com/aboutus/

Crisis Lifeline

If you or a loved one is in a crisis, it is important to get help immediately. If in danger of suicide:

  • Call 911
  • Go to the nearest emergency room
  • Call the toll-free, 24-hour hotline of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 988

National Suicide Prevention Week

Practicing Self-Care

Practicing Self-Care

Practicing self-care is essential to maintaining a healthy mind and body. Oftentimes our busy schedules get in the way of even basic self-care acts. However, it is important to make time for these activities in order to better your overall wellness. 

There are an infinite number of ways to practice self-care. With an individual’s differing needs and wants, it is important to recognize that people may enjoy varying ways of self-care. To discover what forms work best for you, we recommend trying various self-care strategies to help you see what you enjoy most.

The following list consists of various ways that you can practice self-care for mind and body health.

Get Enough Sleep

Sleep is essential to the health of one’s mind and body. Without enough sleep, it can be hard to think and feel motivated throughout the day. The CDC recommends that adults aged 18-60 get at least 7 hours of sleep each night. To help reach this goal, we suggest creating a sleep schedule, avoiding energizing activities in the evening, and making your sleeping environment comfortable.

Eat Nutrient-Dense foods

Eating nutrient-dense foods helps promote better physical health, but it can also improve the health of your mind. The National Institute of Mental Health recommends eating a healthy, balanced diet and staying hydrated to help you think clearly and feel energized.

Get Physical

Physical activity can improve the health of your body as well as your mind. It is important to note that no form of exercise is too small. Each step helps you work towards a healthier self.

Recognize Stressors

To help avoid stress, it is important to recognize what triggers it. Although many stressors may be unavoidable, others may be easier to avoid. Try to eliminate any unnecessary stressors from your life. 

Change Your Mindset

It is hard to find happiness when focusing on the negatives in life. Try to look for the best in situations. On days that are especially challenging mentally, try to find or create one positive from the day.

Meditate

Meditation can help clear one’s mind and create a sense of balance. The are various methods of meditation, many of which may take some practice before their true benefit can be realized. Like all self-care, it is important to note that everyone has their own preference on what type of meditation they find most beneficial. 

Spend Time Outside

Spending time outdoors can be very relaxing and grounding. In an increasing technology dependent world, you may find yourself not spending much time outside. We suggest spending time outside, even if only for short periods. With the fresh air and presence of nature, many find that their mindset improves after spending time outdoors.

Create Boundaries

It is okay to create boundaries and say “no” to others. Between work and personal life, many find that they are constantly saying “yes” to things they don’t want to be doing. It is important to learn these boundaries for yourself, and recognize that it is okay to say “no” to protect your own mental health.

Take Time for Yourself and What Makes You Happy

Everyone deserves time to focus on what brings them joy. By doing something you love, you can help relieve stress and feel happier. Whether you enjoy reading, hiking, watching sports, or anything else, your happiness matters. Make time in your schedule to focus on the things you love.

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